Training design - Cathy Moore

Introduction

3 classic tips for writing training scenarios

How to write a strong mini-scenario, why you want to use “showing” feedback, and how to make your characters sound like real people: Three classic scenario tips from my blog. Learn more.

3 classic tips for writing training scenarios

Need to write a scenario question? Get ideas from these three classic blog posts that you might have missed.

Man sleeping in train seat

Example: The same scenario question three ways

What's the difference between a quiz question, a mini-scenario with poor feedback, and a strong scenario question? Compare these versions of the same data-security question and discover an unusual use for a Chipmunks CD.

Voice descends from clouds saying "Incorrect!"

Example: A deeper look at "showing" feedback

I've just made a decision in your scenario. Should you now tell me what I did right or wrong, or just show me the consequence of my decision?

I vote for "show" because I want to use my brain. Here's an example of how it works, plus an early encounter with the Omniscient One, that faceless know-it-all who dominates elearning.

Droid head becomes human head

7 ways to make scenario dialog sound natural

These tips will make your scenario characters believable, relatable, and concise. (The most common mistake I see is too much small talk. See tip #2 for the solution.)

Want personal feedback on your scenarios?

My four-week online scenario design course gives you hands-on practice writing scenarios for training, plus my personal feedback on your work. Learn more.