How to design software training, part 2: Practice activities

Here’s an alternative to traditional software training: Create self-contained activities that help people learn by doing, and make the activities available on demand. Learn more.

Can we use scenarios to teach concepts?

“You can’t just throw people into an activity without first teaching them the concepts.” Yes, we can. Check out this simple example. Learn more.

Video: 3 ways to motivate

How can we motivate people to complete our activities and change what they do on the job? Here’s a video of the webinar I recently ran on that topic, plus a summary of what we talked about. Learn more.

How to really involve learners

Create a stream of self-contained activities, let people pull information as they need it, slowly increase the challenge with scaffolding, and be a hero. All in one blog post. Learn more.

Scenario mistakes to avoid #2: “Eat! Eat! You need to eat!”

Do we really need to force-feed people information before they can try a scenario? Learn more.

Let me tell you everything you need to know! Or not.

You’re going to work in Zekostan! How would you like to prepare for the cultural differences? Do you want me to tell you everything and then quiz you? No? What’s the alternative? Learn more.

5 quick ways to pull learners into a course

How can you create a lively start to your course? Try these five techniques to get learners involved and kick up the pace. Learn more.

Throw them in the deep end! (but keep a life preserver handy)

What happens if you let learners try to figure it out themselves first, and only then teach them? They could learn much more deeply, according to several studies. Learn more.

Why you want to put the activity first

Turn traditional training on its head: Challenge learners from the start with decision-making scenarios and let them learn through experience. It’s not only more interesting and memorable, it makes our designs more efficient. Learn more.

5 ways to make linear navigation more interesting

This slideshow is an attempt to help people make the best of a limiting design. Regular readers know that I’m no fan of the Next button. (Are you new here? Try Why you really want to be short or Visual menus: Structure with style). Thanks to Erik Wallen–his comment on Is a course really the […]

Design scenarios that learners love

- New online sessions for June 2018
- Special session for Asia-Pacific
- Hands-on scenario writing
- Lively, interactive sessions

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